Program on Ancient Technologies and Archaeological Materials 

ISAS Awards Two ATAM Student Mini-Grants for 2015–2016 Academic Year

Montana Martin and Adam Sutherland were both awarded ATAM student mini-grants for the 2015–2016 academic year. Martin and Sutherland are Anthropology students at the University of Illinois. Martin's proposal is entitled Stable Isotope Analysis of Havana and Hopewell Pots, and Sutherland's proposal is entitled Diet during the Middle to Late Woodland Transition: Stable Isotope Analysis of Pottery Sherds from the Apple Creek Site, Greene County, IL. Each student will receive $500 to be applied to costs of analysis.

The ATAM Student Mini-Grants in Archaeometry are intended to assist University of Illinois Urbana–Champaign undergraduate and graduate students complete theses, capstone or other projects involving instrumental analyses of archaeological or art historical materials, or address archaeological questions.


ADAM SUTHERLAND is a PhD Student in Anthropology at the University of Illinois with a research focus on the Early Late Woodland (400–600 CE) period in the Lower Illinois River Valley. His ATAM project will use Stable Isotope Analysis of absorbed food residues in ceramic pots to look at diet at during the Whitehall Phase in Illinois. Through a comparison of the Apple Creek and Egan sites he will explore variations in diet during this period and how it relates to the larger transition away from Middle Woodland practices.


Montana MartinMONTANA MARTIN is a PhD Student in Anthropology at the University of Illinois with a research focus on the period of transition from the Early to the Middle Woodland in the Central Illinois River Valley. His ATAM project will use Stable Isotope Analysis of absorbed food residues in ceramic pots to look at diet at a ritual site during the Middle Woodland in Illinois. Eight sherds from Ogden-Fettie, located in Fulton County Illinois, were analyzed, six Havana and two Hopewell sherds. The analyses will help to expand our knowledge of the diet during the Middle Woodland and will help to explain the changes taken place during the transition from the Early to Middle Woodland.